Where’s lactose?

Forbidden Foods

Foods

· Cow, goat, sheep, mare (mammals milk)
· Human milk
· Powdered milk
· Evaporated milk
· Condensed milk
· Milkshakes
· Butter
· Cream
· Fresh cream
· Yoghurt
· Fresh cheese
· Fermented or cured cheese
· Single cream
· Quark
· Dairy desserts
· Flans
· Custards
· Rice pudding
· Mousse
· Ice cream
· Bechamel sauce
· Milk chocolate

Ingredients

· Lactose
· Lactose monohydrate
· Milk sugar
· Milk solids
· Whey, milk serum (1)
· Milk fat

Additives

· E966 Lactitol (1)

Foods may contain lactose

Foods

· Creams
· Soups
· Breads
· Cakes and tarts
· Cold meat
· Processed meat
· Fried meat
· Puree (potato, vegetable, etc.)
· Pastries: donuts, muffins, buns, etc.
· Biscuits
· Creps
· Crackers
· Ready meals
· Enriched cereals
· Salad dressing
· Mayonnaise
· Ice cream sherbets
· Milkshakes
· Battered
· Chocolate substitutes
· Instant soups
· Alcoholic drinks (fermented or distiled) (2)
· Margarine (3)

Products

· Excipients in medications (4)
· Vitamin complexes
· Toothpastes

Ingredients

· Rennet (5)

Allowed foods

Foods

· Natural fruit
· Dried fruit
· Fish
· Seafood
· Cereals
· Eggs
· Honey
· Marmalade
· Potatoes
· Rice
· Pasta
· Vegetables
· Legumes
· White and red meat
· Vegetal drinks: soy, coconut, oats, rice, almonds ,etc
· Starch (rice, corn, wheat, potatoes)

Dairy origin additives (6)

· Milk protein
· Casein
· Caseinate
· Calcium caseinate (old H/E4511 )
· Sodium caseinate (old H/E4512)
· Potassium caseinate (old H/E4513)
· Magnesium caseinate
· Protein hidrolyzate
· Lactalbumin
· Lactoglobulin

Additives

· E101 Riboflavin or Lactoflavin
· E101A Riboflavin or Lactoflavin Phospate
· E106 Lactoflavin Phospate
· E270 Lactic acid
· E325 Sodium Lactate
· E326 Potassium Lactate
· E327 Calcium Lactate
· E328 Ammonium Lactate
· E329 Magnesium Lactate
· E585 Ferrous lactate derived from E270
· E415 Xanthan gum
· E418 Gellan gum
· E472b Lactid acid esters of mono and diglycerides of fatty acids
· E575 Glucono Delta Lactona
· E480 Dioctil Sulfosuccinato Sodio
· E481 Sodium stearoyl 2 lactylate
· E482 Calcium stearoyl 2 lactylate
· E963 Tagatose

( ) Clarifications

(0) ALLERGENS ON LABELLING OF PACKAGED AND UNPACKAGED PRODUCTS
El Regulation (EU) 1169/2011 on food information provided to the customer establishes that information on allergens -that appear in appendix II and include dairy and dairy derivatives including lactose- must appear on the list of ingredients on all packaged goods, and must be highlighted to stands out clearly from the other ingredients (e.g. using type of font, style, background colour, etc.). In the absence of a list of ingredients, in the case of a product with a single ingredient, it must also mention that it “contains” followed by the substance or product appearing in appendix II. Likewise, allergens in unpackaged foods sold to the end customers must also be indicated (sale in bulk in shops, markets, etc.).

(1) EXCEPTIONS TO THE OBLIGATION OF INCLUSION ON LABELLING (DAIRY)
Regulation (EU) 1169/2011 on the food information provided to the consumer, in appendix II, specifies the two unique exceptions -in the case of dairy- that are foreseen in the obligation to be stated on the label of food products:
Lactitol Derivative of lactose. This is used as a low calorie sweetener for sweets, sugar-free chewing gum, biscuits, icecream, low-calorie foods and laxatives.
Whey Only when used in the process of making distilled alcoholic drinks

(2) EXCEPTION TO THE OBLIGATION OF INCLUSION ON LABELLING (ALCOHOLIC DRINKS)
Alcoholic drinks are divided into two types according to their manufacturing process and final alcohol percentage:
Fermented drinks -those with an alcohol percentage <15º/<15% like wine, beer, cider, cava, etc.-
Distilled drinks or spirits -those with an alcohol percentage >15º/>15% like gin, whisky, rum, etc.
Regulation (EU) 1169/2011 on the food information provided to the consumer establishes that alcoholic drinks containing over 1,2%/1,2º in alcohol volume -the majority of alcoholic drinks both fermented and distilled- therefore, are currently exempt from the manufacturer’s obligation to include nutritional information and a list of ingredients on the label.

(3)MARGARINE
Margarine should be 100% vegetable,but on the market the majority of margarines have added dairy and it’s best to only consume those where the manufacturer explicitly guarantees the absence of dairy.

(4) EDO, EXCIPIENTS THAT MUST OBLIGATORILY BE STATED ON MEDICATION
Although medications are outside the specific regulation on allergens provided by Regulation (EU) 1169/2011 on the food information provided to the consumer, they are obliged to declare those known as excipients of obligatory declaration (EDO) which continue to be updated according to scientific and technical progress and according to the provisions of the European Union in these regards (art.34 of RD 1345/2007). And it is based on the European standard (Directive 2001/83/CE) and legislation included in the legal order that the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices put together the EDP in its newsletter 2/2008 on “Information on excipients on labels, prospects and technical data sheets of medications for human consumption“ which included the following sugars as of obligatory declaration: Glucose, Fructose, Galactose, Lactose, Lactitol, Maltitol, Manitol, Sacrose, Sorbitol and Xilitol.
In the pharmaceutical industry lactose is the basis of more than 20% of prescription drugs sold and 65% of OTC medicines. Currently 808 drugs contain lactose as an excipient, and is notifiable. Lactose as an excipient, it helps the active ingredient of the drug will work in a stable, effective and safe for the patient who takes it. It is used in tablets by their solubility and palatability, but also found in other presentations (vials, suspensions, inhalers). Source SEIAC 2010

(5) RENNET
Ferment we find in the stomach mucous of some mammals (goat, sheep or cow) and is used to curdle milk . The active substance of rennet is chymosin, which when added to milk causes it to separate into casein and whey. This process is required to create all cheeses. Although animal bennet continues to be produced today, the cheese industry has found ways to produce chymosin using bacterial cultures or fermentation, and we must be careful about their origin and always ask the manufacture in each case before using them.

(6) INGREDIENTS OF DAIRY ORIGIN CROSSED CONTAMINATION
Take care with ingredients or additives of dairy origin. Although they are not related to lactose there may be crossed contamination with lactose due to them having the same dairy origin. We must always get in touch with the manufacturer for them to guarantee the absence of lactose cross contamination and that they are suitable for people with intolerance.